Red Wine

There will always be contention when it comes to selecting the top ten red wines. One group of people will like this wine; another group will like a different one. Some folks will always be loyal to local vintners, no matter what. These are the intangibles that affect the selection of the top ten red wines, but by and large most wine enthusiasts can agree on the following ten reds this year, in no particular order.

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Like many other nascent wine hobbyists, at one time or another you have probably stepped into a grocery or liquor store and made a bee-line for the red wines. After all, folks are always drinking red wine in most TV shows and movies, so you have to follow suit, right? Not necessarily! There is a lot of contention on the whole “red wine vs white wine” issue amongst wine drinkers and wine makers, so let’s explore that a bit.

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An old saying in the wine world is, “I love cooking with wine. Sometimes I even put it in my food”. This adage lies at the heart of experienced cooks and every sommelier in the world. You can add wine to many foods to enhance flavor and marinade your steaks and fish. But did you know you can add wine in more ways than just one? Not only can add wine directly, but you can also use red wine vinegar for an extra unique flavor. If you’re expecting a lot of guests and want a great marinade for your meats, red wine vinegar marinade is a great way to spice up your meal!
You don’t need to go very far to find red wine vinegar marinade. In fact, you probably have the main ingredient to make it right in your kitchen- red wine. Remember, in the traditional sense, wine turns to vinegar if left too long in the bottle. This is why even the sturdiest red wines must be consumed after several decades or risk being ruined by oxygen. So how do cooks get red wine vinegar? Do they really wait years? Nope. Instead of waiting for this to happen (which can take years), there’s a simple technique many cooks use to induce the conversion process of wine to vinegar.
To make red wine vinegar marinade, first you need to setup your red wine in a crock or bowl and add Mycoderma aceti bacteria. You can find this in packets from stores and websites catering to wine and beer hobbyists for a very low price. Let the bowl of wine and bacteria sit for 2-3 months, and slowly introduce more wine to the mixture until the thick layer at the top falls to the bottom. Once you see the thick film at the top sink (also called mother of vinegar), your red wine vinegar is ready to use in a marinade! Be sure you filter your red wine vinegar, and bottle the finished product for maximum freshness and lifespan.
To craft a delicious marinade from your red wine vinegar, add the following ingredients to 2 cups of red wine vinegar: 1 cup of red wine, 1 teaspoon of crushed garlic cloves or garlic powder, 1 teaspoon of oregano, 2 tablespoons of pure virgin olive oil and a half-cup of Italian dressing. If you want more spice, add a small amount of Worcestershire sauce or Soy sauce.
This red wine vinegar marinade can be added to steaks, chicken or pork. To properly marinade, spread the mixture over the meat and let sit in the refrigerator prior to cooking. For steaks, overnight marinating ensures a moist and tender cut and is a great way to spice up a less expensive cut. For chicken or pork, most tend to marinade for an hour or two just prior to cooking. Either way, a red wine vinegar marinade brings out the best flavors in meat and wine! Red wine vinegar marinade is a great all-natural addition to any kitchen complement of tasty preparations.

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If you like to cook, you’re probably familiar with red wine vinegar. Most of us have no idea whether it really comes from red wine or not. The truth of the matter is yes, it does indeed come from red wine. If you’ve ever wanted to make red wine vinegar, here are a couple of red wine vinegar recipes so you can make it yourself!
Everybody’s heard about wine left out too long or aged improperly turning into vinegar. There is some truth to this old tale. Under the right conditions, wine can turn into vinegar, but this isn’t always the case. In order for wine to become vinegar, you have to have the right kind of bacteria present. You may have looked at vinegar under a microscope in biology class in high school and already know that vinegar contains an active, live bacteria called Mycoderma aceti. Now, don’t let yourself get dissuaded right off the bat – we need these bacteria in our red wine vinegar recipes!
So what do we need for our red wine vinegar recipes? Well, there are two ways to do it, the old-fashioned, more time-consuming way or the short route. Red wine vinegar recipes, no matter what way you slice it, need a vinegar mother, also known as a mother of vinegar. The vinegar mother is simply an unpleasant looking layer of accumulated bacteria that contains most of the bacteria in the vinegar. If you want to do things the old-fashioned way, you can make the vinegar mother yourself, but if you want to take a short cut you can buy one on the internet or at a store that has accessories for wine makers.
Old-fashioned red wine vinegar recipes are the harder of the two, but arguably the most fulfilling and gratifying. You first need to add your Mycoderma aceti bacteria (which you can buy online or at the aforementioned store) to your wine in a crock, sized for how much vinegar you need. Next, cover the top of the crock with cheese cloth and secure it with a rubber band. Set it somewhere cool (not the fridge – that’s too cool), and let it go for three months. After three months, a vinegar mother will have formed. Once you have confirmed that, begin adding roughly a cup of wine each week until the vinegar mother sinks to the bottom of the crock. After the mother sinks, you can filter the vinegar with coffee filters to get rid of any solids and put it in a bottle for storage.
If you don’t have a lot of time but still want to make red wine vinegar, you can buy a vinegar mother and cut the prep time in half. In this case, it’s the same method as above, but you add one or two cups of wine to the crock once or twice weekly for three weeks then let it sit for eight weeks. After that, filter your vinegar and bottle it. It’s that easy!

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In the early 90s, a study was conducted that revealed something called the “French Paradox.” The paradox was essentially this: how could the French people, who everyone knows love their cheeses and fatty foods, all stay in good shape and have a low incidence of heart disease? What this study found was that from an early age, all French people consume at least one glass a day of red wine.
The study focused on the contents of red wine to see what was having such an effect. Eventually, they discovered a antioxidant called resveratrol present in the red wine. After studying resveratrol for some time, they determined that this was the key. Resveratrol has since been found to have anti-aging and cancer-fighting effects and helps to keep your arteries cleaned out, preventing stroke. It also reduces your chances of developing coronary heart disease and ulcers. As if this wasn’t enough, studies have also found that resveratrol helps fight osteoporosis, ovarian cancer, and strokes for women. For men, it helps with high blood pressure and fighting heart attacks.
While there is no wonder drug or cure-all, resveratrol is very helpful in keeping you healthy. So much so, in fact, that many companies have taken to making red wine supplements. Many people want the healing effects of resveratrol, but can’t drink red wine or simply don’t like to-that’s what red wine supplements are for!
You do need to be careful when buying red wine supplements, however. Many of them do not contain as much resveratrol as you might think. All the various companies that make them will say different things about their products, but look on the back of the bottle (if you’re shopping for the supplement at your health food store or the like) and make sure that it has a high content of resveratrol in each tablet. 100 mg is a good starting point. If you’re shopping online, make sure you do some research to find out exactly what is in each tablet.
Red wine supplements are by no means dangerous, but you want to make sure that you get what you pay for. Resveratrol is what it’s all about, and that is what you want a lot of in your supplement. Otherwise, you’re just wasting your hard-earned dollars on something that can’t hurt you, but probably won’t help much.
In the end, if you want the healing effects of resveratrol but can’t drink red wine or simply don’t like the taste, you should definitely look into getting some red wine supplements. These handy little pills can give you all the beneficial effects of red wine without you having to drink a single drop! As with everything, however, buyer beware. There are a few supplement companies out there that have taken short cuts in producing these supplements. If you’re not careful, you might get a supplement with a measly 2-3 mg per tablet, when what you really need is 100 mg. Do your research, get the supplement you need, and enjoy the effects!

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Sooner or later, if you are an avid red wine drinker you are going to end up with some red wine stains on carpet. It’s like it all happens in slow-motion: you see the glass of wine tumbling, you reach out to try and stop it, but it’s too late. You have a spill. Red wine on any carpet is bad, but if you have a light-colored carpet, it makes an even worse impression as the blot of red and purple spreads out and begins to soak in. The good news here, however, is that you can remove red wine stains on carpet!

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Any hobby comes with risks. For wine collectors and drinkers, this will often usually come in the form of a wine spill. Every now and then, inebriation from having too much wine or just plain old bad luck will cause even the most experienced wine hobbyist to knock over a glass of wine or swirl it a little too much. Unfortunately, wine is one of the hardest stains to remove, and quite often (and unfortunately) it’s red wine that’s been spilled. Removing red wine stains is possible by following a few instructions to make sure your favorite drink isn’t permanently stained on your floor or furniture.

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Any hobby comes with risks and occasional accidents. For wine lovers, this often comes in the form of a spill. Every now and then, inebriation from having too much wine or just plain bad luck will cause even the most experienced wine hobbyist to knock over a glass of wine or swirl it a little too aggressively. Unfortunately, wine is one of the hardest stains to remove, and quite often (and unfortunately) it’s red wine that’s been spilled. Removing red wine stain is possible by following a few instructions to make sure your favorite drink isn’t permanently stained on your floor or furniture.

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In the 1990s, a phenomenon called the “French Paradox” came to light and turned the health care community on its collective head. The paradox is this: the French, who are infamous throughout the world for their consumption of fatty foods (such as cheese), are blessed with a very low incidence of heart issues. How is this so? It’s in the red wine they drink on a daily basis. Since the study that revealed that fact went public, many, if not most, in the health care community have embraced the benefits of drinking of red wine.

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Many people out there, that don’t know any better, usually assume that wine, no matter the color, should be chilled. After all, most beverages we drink are generally stored in the refrigerator. While this may be more suitable for white (though not recommended – more on that later), it is definitely not the case for reds. The proper red wine storage will result in a wine that is actually closer to room temperature than the temperature in your fridge.

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